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Metatutor News

GCSE and A-Level Results 2021

Unfortunately due to the pandemic, GCSE and A-Level exams were cancelled again in 2021. Grades were awarded based on teacher assessments.

746,880 students were entered for GCSE mathematics and 97,960 for A-Level mathematics in 2021. The GCSE results were very similar to the previous two years, with a slight increase in the top 3 grades. A-Level grades jumped again this year but not to the same extent as last summer.

Metatutor’s results this year were very strong – however I must preface this by saying we had a smaller sample size this year due to the cancelled exams. Nevertheless, the results were very impressive.

92% of our students passed their exams, which is a big increase from 2020 (76%) and even better than 2019’s brilliant results (88%). Comparing this to the UK average of 69%, this means that if you get tutoring with Metatutor you are 23% more likely to pass your exams! This was great to see, but probably the most exciting statistic was that 83% of our higher tier GCSE students achieved a Level 7 or above which is massively up from 2020 (60%). We also achieved our first ever top grade (Level 9 at GCSE/A* at A-Level). All of our A-Level students passed and in fact they all achieved A/A* grades.

The average grade achieved by our GCSE students was 5.27, which is way up from year (4.88) and is still considerably higher than the UK average grade (4.61).

The below table shows the percentage of students that achieved each grade or above, for our students and the UK as a whole. This year’s data is also compared to 2020 and 2019. All the data used can be found here.

We were delighted with this year’s results. Congratulations to all of this year’s students. Next year we will have supported many more students (provided things get back to normal – fingers crossed!) and I would expect 2022’s results to be much more representative. But let’s take nothing away from this year’s students and their tutors for their brilliant grades. Let’s hope this year wasn’t an anomaly and we do just as well next year!

Click here to read testimonials from some of our clients (and here for Google My Business reviews).

And if you live in Bristol and your son or daughter has just started Year 11 or Year 13 and you want them to do as well in their maths as our 2021 cohort did, book in a free taster session.

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